Friday, 18 April 2014

Wow! Who knew?

I haven't made any earth shattering discoveries of late, except .....


I know that as children we are taught to respect our elders. We see them in a very different way to that of an adult through the naivety of childhood. As we grow, we learn more about them as people and about their lives when they were younger. I find it fascinating, and even now, I learn new things about my Grandparents.

At the beginning of April, I went across to York to visit my Grandad as it was his 90th Birthday and he was having a party. There were relatives there who I hadn't seen since I was a child and found it brilliant to catch up with them. It's strange, isn't it? How we remember people as we last saw them. Now much older, but still the same. Whilst talking to my Grandad, I witnessed something that I hadn't seen before. He was proud of me. That's not to say he hasn't always been, but I hadn't seen it for myself.

I also took the opportunity to visit my Grandma. She had a stroke some time ago now, and has lost her independence and some of her abilities. She may have changed physically, but beneath that exterior, she still has moments where you can see she's still as sharp as a knife. As Lindsay will attest, my Gran always had an air of Hyacinth Bucket from "Keeping Up Appearances" about her. She was from a reasonably well off family, who were people of standing in the Village where she lives. Times change of course, along with circumstance, but she has always retained her well spoken demeanour and the respect of her fellow Villagers.

That weekend, however, she managed to surprise me. Proved to me that she's a dark horse with a rum sense of humour. I'd never seen that side before, nor had I ever heard her use a rude word. I loved it, laughed and joined in the banter (without using any naughty words) which in turn brought a smile to her face. It's a memory that will always stay with me and make me smile whenever I remember it.

I have also learnt, over the years, about my other Grandparents. Anecdotes and things about them. Families are a funny thing aren't they. ;-)

So as my discoveries are about my Grandparents, this week, I thought I would share a limerick with you which I wrote a little while ago, about my maternal Nan, who is sadly no longer with us.


A Unique Woman Called Anne:

There once was a Woman called Anne
The Amblesea Guest House she ran
Practical jokes and food fights
Gave the guests much delight
That waggish Landlady called Anne!

That very same woman called Anne
Was no conventional Mum or Nan
Her eyes waywardly gleamed
Removing her teeth made us scream
Oh, that mischievous Nanna called Anne!


Thanks for reading. ;-) x


Reactions:

2 comments:

Colin Davies said...

Hahahaha.

And that'sall I've got to say about that.

Christo said...

Thanks for this, Louise - I consider our grandparents to be under celebrated, yet often they will have had a profound effect on our lives.
Certainly my Mum's Mum was very valuable to me and the first real sense of loss I remember in my mid-tenns after the early death of my father was the death of Nan.
I regret the fact that I never knew my other three grandparents as all of them had died before I was born - living into one's sixties was not anywhere near as usual back then as it is today.
Nice that you have been able to see devilment as well as adult respectability - an added joy to the friendship and love you have shared.